SSID

Here you can set the parameters for each SSID as follows:





Communication between end devices on this SSID
Depending on the application, it may be desirable—or even undesirable—for clients on a WLAN network to communicate with other clients. Here you configure whether communication between the WLAN clients on the WLAN network should be allowed.
Bandwidth limits (Mbps)
Here you can limit the WLAN bandwidth used for the entire WLAN network (SSID) or limit the bandwidth available to the clients. All of the logged in clients can only send and receive data with the transmission rate configured here. The value "0" means that no limitation is active.
Timing
Timing uses time frames to switch individual SSIDs on and off according to a schedule. One profile may contain several rows with different time frames. Add the time frame here so that it is observed for this SSID.
Edit Timeframes




Name
Enter the name of the time frame so that it can be referenced from the WLAN SSID. Several entries with the same name result in a common profile. Predefined time frames are ALWAYS and NEVER.
Home
The start time (time of day) can be specified in the format HH:MM (default: 00:00), from which the selected profile becomes valid.
Stop
The stop time (time of day) can be specified in the format HH:MM (default: 00:00), from which the selected profile ceases to be valid.
Note: A stop time of HH:MM usually runs until HH:MM:00. The stop time 00:00 is an exception, since this is interpreted as 23:59:59.
Weekdays
Here you select the weekday on which the timeframe is to be valid. Possible values:
  • Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Holiday
You can form a time schedule with the same name but with different times extending over several rows.
VLAN-ID
This VLAN ID is used to tag the data packets arriving from the WLAN and heading for the LAN. Similarly, packets with this VLAN ID arriving from the LAN are directed to the WLAN and are de-tagged.
Note: This operating mode corresponds to what is normally known as the "Access" tagging mode, since it is assumed that wireless clients usually transmit data untagged. Tagging mode cannot be adjusted.
Other
Multicast-to-Unicast
For each WLAN network, you individually configure whether and how multicasts are converted into unicasts.
No
No conversion
Convert to unicast
Multicasts are converted to unicasts (layer-2 unicast on the WLAN layer with a unicast MAC address as destination). This corresponds to the behavior in the LCOS.
Encapsulate in Unicast Aggregate
Multicasts are encapsulated in unicast aggregates (A-MSDU with unicast MAC address as destination and containing a single layer-2 multicast). This variant should be used where target applications check the destination MAC address. However, note that aggregates are not supported by 802.11a/b/g clients.
Important: In order for this feature to work, it is necessary to enable IGMP snooping on the device and to configure it correctly. The device uses IGMP snooping to determine which client should receive which multicast stream. This ensures that the appropriate target clients or addresses are available for the multicast conversion.
ARP handling
Clients in the wireless network that are on standby do not reliably answer the ARP requests from other network stations. If "ARP handling" is activated, the access point takes over this task and answers the ARP requests on behalf of stations that are on standby. In large networks, this means more efficient use is made of the medium time because ARP queries and responses no longer have to be sent to the WLAN client, but are instead answered by the access point. The LCOS LX access point identifies the IP address / MAC address assignment from the DHCP messages that are exchanged between the WLAN client and the DHCP server. If the assignment is known, ARP requests are answered by the access point and no longer forwarded to the client.
Note: If the IP address/MAC address assignment could not be determined, ARP requests are still routed to the WLAN with the operating mode set to "On".
Important: If the IP address/MAC address assignment could not be determined, ARP requests are not routed to the WLAN with the operating mode set to "Strict". This means, for example, that no connection can be initiated from the LAN to WLAN clients with fixed IP addresses (no DHCP). In this case, this feature should not be employed.
Off
ARP handling disabled. ARP requests are always routed to the WLAN.
On
ARP handling enabled. ARP requests are only forwarded to the WLAN if the IP address/MAC address assignment could not be determined.
Strict
ARP handling enabled. ARP requests are not routed to the WLAN.
Multicast-to-Unicast
For each WLAN network, you individually configure whether and how multicasts are converted into unicasts.
No
No conversion
Convert to unicast
Multicasts are converted to unicasts (layer-2 unicast on the WLAN layer with a unicast MAC address as destination). This corresponds to the behavior in the LCOS.
Encapsulate in Unicast Aggregate
Multicasts are encapsulated in unicast aggregates (A-MSDU with unicast MAC address as destination and containing a single layer-2 multicast). This variant should be used where target applications check the destination MAC address. However, note that aggregates are not supported by 802.11a/b/g clients.
Important: In order for this feature to work, it is necessary to enable IGMP snooping on the device and to configure it correctly. The device uses IGMP snooping to determine which client should receive which multicast stream. This ensures that the appropriate target clients or addresses are available for the multicast conversion.
ARP handling
Clients in the wireless network that are on standby do not reliably answer the ARP requests from other network stations. If "ARP handling" is activated, the access point takes over this task and answers the ARP requests on behalf of stations that are on standby. In large networks, this means more efficient use is made of the medium time because ARP queries and responses no longer have to be sent to the WLAN client, but are instead answered by the access point. The LCOS LX access point identifies the IP address / MAC address assignment from the DHCP messages that are exchanged between the WLAN client and the DHCP server. If the assignment is known, ARP requests are answered by the access point and no longer forwarded to the client.
Note: If the IP address/MAC address assignment could not be determined, ARP requests are still routed to the WLAN with the operating mode set to "On".
Important: If the IP address/MAC address assignment could not be determined, ARP requests are not routed to the WLAN with the operating mode set to "Strict". This means, for example, that no connection can be initiated from the LAN to WLAN clients with fixed IP addresses (no DHCP). In this case, this feature should not be employed.
Off
ARP handling disabled. ARP requests are always routed to the WLAN.
On
ARP handling enabled. ARP requests are only forwarded to the WLAN if the IP address/MAC address assignment could not be determined.
Strict
ARP handling enabled. ARP requests are not routed to the WLAN.

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